Miyakodori

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Manitowoc Lincoln High School revives Jens Jensen council ring design

MANITOWOC – Manitowoc Lincoln High School Class of 1972 held a dedication ceremony for the Centennial Council Ring on Aug. 27. The ring is in front of the school’s natatorium.

The class raised close to $46,000 to complete the gift in commemoration of its 50th class reunion and the 100th anniversary of the high school.

The brick seating structure offers an outdoor gathering space for students that honors Lincoln High School’s history.

The original council ring was also in front of the school natatorium but was removed when it fell into disrepair. Many alumni remember sitting and waiting for the pool to open and some teachers holding classes there. It was designed by landscape architect Jens Jensen, who also designed the Lincoln High School campus.

The Class of 1972 Gift Committee also had three red flowering crab trees planted to frame the seating.

Related: Manitowoc Lincoln: 100 years ago, board voted to hire prominent architects to build campus

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► Historic Washington House Museum & Visitor Center extends season to Nov. 23: Two Rivers Historical Society has announced newly extended operating hours for the Historic Washington House Museum & Visitor Center, 1622 Jefferson St., Two Rivers.

The Museum & Visitor Center is now open to the public from noon until 5 p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays through Nov. 23, marking a significant extension to the former summer and fall hours at the museum.

The sign at the Historic Washington House as seen, Wednesday, September 15, 2021, in Two Rivers, Wis. The firm is claimed to be the birth place of the Sundae.

Admission remains free, although donations are appreciated. The Washington House’s extended hours include Berner’s Ice Cream Parlor, commemorating the invention of the ice cream sundae in 1881, for which Two Rivers is renowned. At the parlor, customers can enjoy Wisconsin-made ice cream in the form of a sundae, dish or cone — before browsing several museum rooms plus the second-floor ballroom, which features rare murals.